Concurrent Sessions

Monday, November 4, 2019

A Sessions - 11:00am - 12:00pm​

A1: Guidelines for Development and Implementation of Functional Prescriptions in Forensic Rehabilitation

11:00am – 12:00pm | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

The functional prescription is a tool that outlines the daily and weekly tasks, and life skills, that are expected for the client to accomplish and routinely engage in in order to ensure forward progression in their rehabilitation journey. It is designed to capture the activities expected to be accomplished within a one-week time frame. This allows both the client and staff to monitor a client’s adherence to the agreed upon expectations.  The functional prescription is developed via a multidisciplinary and client collaboration, and it is individualized to fit each client’s unique needs. It is also designed to reflect the day-to-day realities and expectations of various community placements in order to encourage discharge readiness and successful community reintegration. We have found that functional prescriptions have also been a great collaborative tool for all multidisciplinary members to participate in. This tool is in the early phases of implementation and we have recently begun to collect data on its effectiveness.

Presenters:

Dr. Anik Gosselin, Psychologist

Danielle Hicks, Social Worker 

Matt LeBlanc, Manager of Patient Care, Brockville Mental Health Centre

Guillaume Tremblay, Nurse Practitioner

Bios:

Dr. Anik Gosselin is a Forensic, Clinical and Neuropsychologist, clinical professor at the University of Ottawa. She works as a full time psychologist at the Brockville Mental Health Centre. Her research interests focus mainly on better understanding variables impacting cognition and emotion regulation among forensic patients to improve clinical outcomes.

Danielle Hicks is a Social Worker with the Brockville Mental Health Centre. She holds a Bachelor of Social Work and a Minor in Psychology from Carleton University, as well as a Master of Social Work from the University of British Columbia. Danielle has varied experience in health care working in both Ontario and British Columbia, including child protection, acute medicine, intensive care units with both adults and infants, an psychiatry. Her main focus has always been mental health.

Matt LeBlanc is the Manager of Patient Care at the Brockville Mental Health Centre. He Graduated in 2012 form Laurentian University with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Currently he is a PhD student with the University of Ottawa, focusing on stigma and violence in Forensic Mental Health.

Guillaume Tremblay recently came to the Royal in September 2018 as the first nurse practitioner to join the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, and he currently practices at the Brockville Mental Health Centre. He is certified in Medical Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. Guillaume has a Master of Nursing from Athabasca University.

A2: Facilitators and Barriers to Building Collaborative and Sustainable Interventions

11:00am – 12:00pm | Lismer Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

Over the past decade, considerable resources have been spent to implement and validate innovative programs and strategies in youth justice. As these evidence-based programs have proliferated and matured, the need for research to understand the conditions and processes necessary to sustain them has also increased. This workshop will present research findings from a pilot study that explored the barriers and facilitators in building a mental health screening model for youth in the justice system. In 2015, the Niagara community launched a new model, the Niagara Youth Court Screening Initiative (NYCSI), where first appearance youth at court are screened for mental health and addiction issues. This intervention has seen great success in Niagara, and has been scaled up in other youth courts across Ontario. The study describes first hand perspectives of personnel and community stakeholders who were involved in developing and implementing the screening model. Participants will learn about the key ingredients that have made this intervention sustainable over time, and they will be able to use this knowledge in developing similar sustainable interventions in their own communities

Presenters:

Marla Banning, CAMH

Debbie Chiodo, CAMH

Mike Taylor, Youth Resources Niagara

Bios:

Marla Banning is an Implementation Specialist in the Provincial Systems Support Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. She works on a variety of projects including scaling up Youth Court Screening Initiatives, the implementation of Staged Screening and Assessment Tools and supporting the Youth Wellness Hub in Niagara.

Debbie Chiodo, PhD is an Evaluator at CAMH and a Professor at Western University. Debbie was a co-lead in the evaluation of the Ontario Unified Family Court System, the evaluation of the Office of the Child’s Advocate, and the assessment of province-wide foster care placements for children in child welfare care.

Mike Taylor is currently the Executive Director of Youth Resources Niagara (YRN). This agency provides residential and community based programs/services for the youth justice and children’s mental health systems. Mike consistently engages in community capacity building initiatives that seek to promote and develop strong multi-systemic community organizational ties.

A3-1: Addictions: A Systems Approach via Social Innovation, Creativity, and Mindfulness

11:00am – 12:00pm | Harris Room

Description:

Almost 75% of those surviving severe trauma and about 50% of individuals with lifetime PTSD have challenges with substance abuse (substance use disorder). The psychosocial impact of trauma is complex and affects not only individuals, but families and communities. A decrease in an individual’s meaning-making, healthy relating, social capital and even economic transactions, result. This presentation uses a systems-thinking approach to addictions, through the lens of social innovation, or, novel social programs that can profoundly change the social system in which a complex social problem such as addiction occurs. It then offers a few examples of social innovations that address addictions, as well as a practical Social Innovation Framework, which can help individuals and agencies address the complexities of reducing addiction in individuals and communities.

Presenters:

Mike Unrau, Mount Royal University

Bios:

Mike Unrau is currently adjunct faculty at Mount Royal University and a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia. He researches creativity, social innovation, and how creative mindfulness impacts social change. He has led research projects across the world, including a social lab in India on PTSD, domestic violence and creative mindfulness.

A3-2: Supportive Housing within the Circle of Addiction Care

11:00am – 12:00pm | Harris Room

Description:

This presentation will explore the relationship between CAMH’s Drug Treatment Court program and LOFT Community Services – Mental Health and Justice Supportive Housing.  We will discuss the failures and victories, the benefits of having a staff member with lived experience within the program, and how the LOFT program as a whole has embraced the new addition.  We will also explore how individuals enter the Drug Treatment Court system and are referred to supportive housing through LOFT.

Presenters:

 Cylene Rainville, LOFT Community Services

Tony Gordinho, LOFT Community Services

Bios:

Cylene Rainville, MA – Director, LOFT Community Services.  Cylene has worked within the mental health, addictions, and homelessness sectors for over 20 years. Cylene thrives on building effective and innovative partnerships in order to provide exemplary client service. 

Tony Gordinho is a Community Support Worker with LOFT Community Services and supports clients in both the MHJI Alternate Level of Care and Drug Treatment Court programs. Tony is the primary worker for all of the current Drug Treatment Court clients and works very closely with the Toronto Drug Court/ CAMH team. Tony brings with him a wealth of experience – both professional and lived experience – and is a strong client advocate.

A4: HSJCC: Crossroads in Mental Health Crisis and Law Enforcement

11:00am – 12:00pm | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

Evolving social, economic and fiscal realities have created a strain in the treatment of mental illness. As a result of this strain, police services often become the first line of contact between a person in crisis and available resources. Police services have had to adapt to this new reality and find collaborative approaches to resolve these difficult, sometimes violent situations. The emergence of mobile crisis teams, situation tables and better training for front line officers has made an impact for some, but the need for a more integrated strategy still exists. This presentation will focus on the York Regional Police integrated strategy which includes all of the above and additional resources including the digitized Brief Mental Health Screener, two full time social workers, a seniors safety unit which specializes in issues such as dementia and vulnerable persons, and Police/Hospitals Relations Committees as well as other resources and future plans.

Presenters:

S/Sgt Jason McIlveen # 998

Bios:

S/Sgt Jason McIlveen has been a police officer for over 20 years with York Regional Police. He is currently the Officer in Charge of the Community Safety and Well Being Unit which oversees the Mental Health Support Teams, two Social Workers, Seniors Safety Unit, Vulnerable Persons Registration and Crime Prevention Unit. He has a passion for mental health awareness and loves his job!

A5: Supporting Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Through a Justice Clinical Lens

11:00am – 12:00pm | MacDonald Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

In response to the 2016 Ombudsman of Ontario Report, the Community Networks of Specialized Care set out to create a refreshed mandate with the goal of providing individuals with high support and complex care needs access to effective and timely supports. As a result of this, the role of the Dual Diagnosis Justice Coordinator (DDJC) was improved by strengthening cross-sector partnerships and providing a clinical lens across all sectors to better support individuals with developmental disabilities. The role of the DDJC is to assist the individual to prepare for all aspects of their court matter using a biopsychosocial approach and principles of Applied Behaviour Analysis when needed. The DDJC works with other court support staff, justice professionals and the individual to ensure they receive the supports they require to experience the justice system in a fair and equitable manner. This process will be highlighted and operationalized by reviewing case examples.

Presenters:

Marnie McDermott, Community Networks of Specialized Care – Central East

Courtney Hutson, Community Networks of Specialized Care – HKPR/Durham

Vicky Simos, Community Networks of Specialized Care – York/Simcoe

Bios:

Marnie McDermott is the Network Manager with Community Networks of Specialized Care-Central East. She received her Masters of Social Work from McGill University. She has worked in the developmental service sector supporting persons with complex needs for over 30 years.

Courtney Hutson is a Dual Diagnosis Justice Coordinator with Community Networks of Specialized Care (HKPR/Durham). She received her Masters of Criminology from Adler University. Courtney has worked for the Psychology Department for Central East Correctional Centre as well as for Canadian Mental Health Association HKPR in Justice Services.

Vicky Simos is a Dual Diagnosis Justice Coordinator with Community Networks of Specialized Care (York/Simcoe). She received her Masters of Applied Disability Studies from Brock University, specializing in Applied Behaviour Analysis. Vicky is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with 12 years experience working with children/adolescence/adults with developmental disabilities.

Monday, November 4, 2019

B Sessions - 1:00pm - 2:30pm​

B1: Older Adults and the Justice System

1:00pm – 2:30pm | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

For the first time ever, there are more Canadians aged 65 and older than Canadians below age 15. All areas of the justice system are encountering the older adult population daily and with increasing frequency. Many of these cases pertain to age-related conditions like dementia, mental health conditions, and/or substance misuse. The traditional justice system is not designed to meet the needs of this vulnerable population.

The Provincial HSJCC has created a navigational guidebook for older adults and adults with age-related conditions who interact with the justice system. The guidebook will assist caregivers and service providers understand dementia and related conditions and the unique needs of this population in the justice system. The guidebook explores housing options, consent and capacity, substitute decision-making, and promotes best practices in policing, courts, forensic mental health and correctional settings. Resources for specific services are highlighted throughout the guide.

Presenters:

Christine Conrad, CMHA Ontario

Katie Almond, Ministry of the Solicitor General

Sarah Denton, North East Behavioural Supports Ontario

Phyllis Fehr, M.L.A., R.N., S.A.N.E.

A.J. Grant-Nicholson, Legal Aid Ontario

Bios:

Christine Conrad is a policy analyst at CMHA Ontario and supports the Provincial HSJCC. Previously, she was program advisor to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and to the former Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. Christine was called to the bar in 2016 after articling with Legal Aid Ontario.

Katie Almond has been working in the criminal justice system for 34 years, 30 of which have been as a Probation and Parole Officer with the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services. For 16 years, she has worked with a client population that is marked by poverty, homelessness, mental illness, physical and developmental disabilities, and polysubstance use. From October 2016 to January 2018, she was seconded to the Corrections Psychological Health Unit, working on mental strategies for both staff and clients. She is the Co-Chair of both the Downtown Toronto HSJCC and Provincial HSJCC.

Sarah Denton graduated with a BScN from McMaster University in 2004. She pursued her passion for mental health working in both the acute and outpatient settings at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. In 2005, Sarah took on the role as the Clinical Resource Nurse on the Adult Psychiatry Inpatient Unit. Soon after, she transitioned to outpatients to assist in the development of an Early Intervention in Psychosis program as a Case Manager. Sarah currently works as the Clinical Intake Lead with North East Behavioural Supports Ontario through the North Bay Regional Health Centre.

Phyllis Fehr M.L.A., R.N., S.A.N.E. was given a working diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s along with possible Lewy Body dementia; she was 53 years of age at the time. Phyllis promotes the abilities of people living with dementia by advocating for people living with this disease both locally, nationally and internationally. She has advocated for change for persons with dementia for 4 years as an Ontario Dementia Advisory board member, with a focus on government policy. Phyllis is on a number of boards and steering committees, including membership on the Advisory Group for the Ontario Dementia strategy and the Early Stage Working Group. She is an active board member for the Alzheimer’s board for HBHN, Dementia Alliance International, the Canadian Dementia Priority steering committee, and numerous others.

A.J. Grant-Nicholson, Bsc. (Hons.), J.D. is a Lawyer and Policy Counsel with extensive experience in mental health related law, substitute decision making and capacity litigation. A.J. develops policy and provides strategic advice for Legal Aid Ontario (LAO) as lead of its Mental Health Strategy. Prior to becoming lead of LAO’s Mental Health Strategy, he worked as a legal aid mental health staff lawyer in the Hamilton/Waterloo/Halton area. A.J. received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Toronto and his law degree from the University of Ottawa.

B2: A Needs Assessment for Planning Mental Health and Justice Housing

1:00pm – 2:30pm | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

For people with justice involvement and mental health or addictions issues, supportive housing can foster stable lives, better health, and reduced service use. But who sets priorities when needs are complex and multiple service systems are involved? CMHA Toronto and Wellesley Institute have partnered with AMHO and the Toronto Alliance to End Homelessness in a community-led initiative. Their 2019 justice-focused project is developing a consensus-based, evidence-informed plan for action in supportive housing. This includes identifying the housing and support needs of this population; documenting successes, gaps, and shortfalls in existing programs; and pointing to priorities and next steps. This project is one component of broader efforts to develop a supportive housing growth plan for Toronto. The workshop will describe this justice-focused work and the resulting findings and recommendations. It will point to funding opportunities, and include reflections on adapting this approach in other Ontario communities.

Presenters:

Frank Sirotich, CMHA Toronto

Greg Suttor, Wellesley Institute

Irma Molina, CMHA Toronto

Bios:

Frank Sirotich, PhD. is Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto, the formerly chair of the Scarborough HSJCC and member of the Toronto HSJCC.

Greg Suttor, PhD. is a senior researcher at Wellesley Institute, with focus areas including housing needs, housing policy, and supportive housing.

Irma Molina is Peer Program Evaluation Project Coordinator at CMHA Toronto.

B3: Mental Health Engagement and Response Team (MHEART): Why Crisis Response Should be Multi-Sectoral and Flexible

1:00pm – 2:30pm | Lismer Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

After years of program reorganization, and re-deployment of resources to meet the needs of individuals in mental health crisis; and coinciding with the creation of the Northumberland County Situation Table, the MHEART program was created. This workshop will share the lived experiences of clients and team members in the development of this innovative and collaborative crisis response program designed to meet the needs of an urban and rural mental health population.

Presenters:

Jennifer Cox, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences

Amy Eriksson MSW

Constable Nick Moeller, Coburg Police Services

Matthew Suurd, Registered Psychiatric Nurse

Constable Jeremy Foley, Northumberland OPP

Emma Taylor, Registered Nurse 

Bios:

Jennifer Cox has worked in the field of mental health for 20 years, her role is an integrated leadership role with Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, Northumberland Hills Hospital and Campbellford Memorial Hospital.

Amy Eriksson has a Master of Social Work degree and has been working in the mental health and addiction field for 17 years.

Nick Moeller started his career with the Toronto Police Service in 2001. In 2016, Nick transitioned to the Cobourg Police Service and is now the Mental Health Resource Officer.

Matthew Suurd is a Registered Psychiatric Nurse and has been working in mental health for 10 years including forensic, crisis and inpatient programs.

Provincial Constable Jeremy Foley started policing with the OPP in 1994. Jeremy is currently the Mental Health Liaison Officer at the Northumberland OPP Detachment and part of the Mental Health Engagement and Response Team.

Emma Taylor is a registered nurse and the clinical manager of the Northumberland hills hospital community mental health services. She has spent her entire nursing career focusing on her passion for mental health. She is dedicated to bringing services to clients in rural areas and bridging the gaps to accessing services. 

B4: KOSSS Land Based and Youth Awareness Program

1:00pm – 2:30pm | MacDonald Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

KOSSS Land Based and Intervention Program helps students refocus their priorities around school and life. It is a place where teachers and elders come in and work with students to help them learn about their identity, history and culture. They also learn about the land through hunting and fishing with lessons and stories that pertain to living in harmony with Creation. Scheduled programming educates students about healthy boundaries, rules, safety, exercises that are based on affirmations, journaling, trust building, life teachings and the creation story. Students do a plan of self-care, as well as look at all the supports that can be accessed and utilized. KOSSS offers a space of safety and security for KOSSS students to work through issues and provides life skill tools to start and continue personal healing.

Presenters:

Toinette Kakepetum, KOSSS

Nicole McKay, KOSSS

Bios:

Toinette Kakepetum is the Well Being Coordinator for KOSSS. Toinette has worked with youth for the last 20 years. 

Nicole McKay is a Land Base Program Coordinator. Nicole enjoys working with youth and being out on the land. 

B5: Joint Mobile Crisis Response Pilot Project: Made in Thunder Bay

1:00pm – 2:30pm | Harris Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

The Joint-Mobile Crisis Response Pilot Project is an innovative partnership between Canadian Mental Health Association – Thunder Bay, Thunder Bay Police Service, and the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre. Crisis workers partner with police to respond to mental health-related 911 calls. This presentation will highlight the Transfer of Care Protocol that was collaboratively developed between police, hospital and crisis response prior to the project launch. This agreement created a shared understanding among community partners about processes and protocols related to transfers of care between police, hospital and crisis response.

This presentation will highlight early successes of the project since its launch by sharing data and lessons learned from the perspective of police, hospital and crisis response. Presenters will outline next steps for the pilot project, which include building upon the JMCR project infrastructure to enhance crisis services.

Presenters:

Evelyne LeBlanc, CMHA Thunder Bay

Lisa Beck, TBRHSC

Inspector Ryan Gibson

Bios:

Evelyne LeBlanc is the Crisis Response Manager at CMHA Thunder Bay. She has over 19 years of experience as a mental health service provider. Evelyne is a Certified Crisis Worker, a Certified Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator, and a Deescalating Potentially Violent Situations, Police Mental Health and Mental Health Works trainer.

Lisa Beck is the Director of the Trauma Program, Critical Care, Emergency Services, the Nurse-led Outreach Team at the TBRHSC. She has over 29 years of health care experience, including 11 years as an ICU nurse, 10 years as an Educator, and 8 years as an Admin Program Director.

Inspector Ryan Gibson has served in Patrol, CIB, Intelligence, OPC, and Community Service. He is very proud of a youth group he leads being recognized for volunteerism. He holds a degree in political science and is a retired Canadian Forces member. He is married to Jennifer and has three boys.

B6: Acquired Brain Injury and Addictions/Mental Health Collaborative

1:00pm – 2:30pm | Governor General Room (2nd Floor)

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

Over several months, a 20-member, multi-sector (hospital and community-based rehabilitation, hospital and community-based mental health and addictions and women’s shelter) and lived experience working group in Southeastern Ontario (SEO) met to develop a mechanism for addressing the complex, unmet needs of adults with moderate-to-severe Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) complicated by mental health/addictions issues. The Working Group developed the referral process, inclusion and exclusion criteria, consent process and forms, discussion format, and performance indicators for three new collaboratives that cover the region.

The purpose of the ABI and Addictions/Mental Health Collabortive is to develop capacity to address complex, unmet needs using a shared-care model incorporating discussion about sequential/concurrent care. The SEO ABI System Navigator coordinates monthly “rounds,” with Collaborative members, including Physiatry, Psychiatry, Addictions, and community service providers, to address unmet needs of people meeting specified criteria including presence of high-risk factors.

Presenters:

Dawn Downey

Bios:

Dawn Downey has a Masters of Art in Leadership and Training. She worked with a community-based Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation and Support service in Southeastern Ontario for almost 30 years, most of that time as the Program Manager. Since recent “retirement” she has been contracted as a project and process facilitator to address team or system issues. Dawn was hired for one year for what became the ABI and Addictions/Mental Health Collaborative.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Breakfast Sessions - 8:00am - 9:00am

BP1: Psychosocial Characteristics of Persons Seen in a Rural Mental Health Court Clinic

8:00am – 9:00am | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

An oral presentation of preliminary findings from the implementation of a rural Mental Health Court Clinic established in January 2018. The MHCC caters to the mental health treatment needs of persons going through the court system. This presentation will describe the psychosocial correlates of clinic participants, the clinic process, organisational characteristics and challenges of an innovative restorative community justice intervention.

Presenters:

Dr. AG Ahmed, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group 

Krista Biccum, Adult Court Support Caseworker

Stacey Shanks, Lanark Leeds-Grenville Addictions and Mental Health

Shawn Souder, Lanark Leeds-Grenville Addictions and Mental Health

Ute White, Lanark Leeds-Grenville Addictions and Mental Health

Bio:

Dr AG Ahmed is a forensic psychiatrist at the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group and a Clinical Investigator at the Institute of Mental Health Research. Formerly the Associate Chief of Psychiatry and clinical head of forensic psychiatry at the ROHCG, Dr. Ahmed is a consultant to the Therapeutic Justice Program of LLGAMH and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Ottawa. An Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at Queen’s University, Dr. Ahmed’s practice and research interests include the assessment and treatment of patients with major mental disorders, personality disorders, psychopathy, dysfunctional anger and aggression.

Krista Biccum has been working in mental health for over 16 years and has held a number of different positions throughout her tenure. As the Adult Court Support Caseworker, she provides consultation, assessment, court diversion plans, court education, and mental health referrals to individuals experiencing mental health concerns who are residents of Leeds Grenville or have been charged with an offence in Leeds & Grenville. Krista has provided numerous presentations on both mental illness, as well as suicide. In addition, she has received training in suicide intervention and is a facilitator for the Self Abuse Finally Ends program.

Stacey Shanks has been working in the mental health and addiction field since 2004. Her undergraduate degree from the University of Ottawa was a BA Honors Psychology Concentration Criminology and she continued her education at University of Ottawa completing a Masters of Education Concentration Educational Counselling. Stacey has worked with justice clients since 2006 in Ottawa, Toronto, and Lanark Leeds-Grenville. She has been employed with Lanark Leeds-Grenville Addictions and Mental Health since 2015 and most recently has been the counsellor to the Drug Treatment Court and Mental Health Court Clinic.

Shawn Souder has been working in the field of mental health for over 25 years. After several years of employment as a social worker in the field of geriatric psychiatry, he then held a variety of leadership positions in both hospital and community settings. Shawn joined Lanark Leeds and Grenville Addictions and Mental Health in 2015 and has collaborated with justice partners to develop and implement the Therapeutic Treatment Court Programs across Lanark Leeds and Grenville.

Ute White studied nursing in Germany and worked in psychiatry and forensic psychiatry for over 20 years. In 2005, she immigrated to Canada and is employed with Lanark Leeds & Grenville Addictions and Mental Health since 2006. In 2017, Ute started working with clients in Drug Treatment Court and Mental Health Court and has been the case manager for both programs.

BP2: Mobile Integrated Team: Creating Capacity Through Mobile Response

8:00am – 9:00am | Governor General Room (2nd Floor)

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

The Mobile Integrated Team is a joint pilot project between Lutheran Community Care Centre, Community Living Thunder Bay and Options Northwest. We provide a flexible and responsive model of support to adults with developmental disabilities and other multi-sector, complex needs in the community of Thunder Bay. This program supports individuals who do not traditionally access mainstream services and are living independently to access community supports and services that will enrich their lives. With a determined focus on community collaboration, MIT strives to increase access and grow the relationship between individuals and community organizations.

Presenters:

Madison Schell, Obie Egbuchulam 

Bio:

Madison Schell grew up in a small town in Northwestern Ontario. She graduated with honours from the Social Service Worker program at Confederation College in Thunder Bay. She is also completing her Honours Bachelor of Indigenous Social Work at Laurentian University through distance education. Madison is a former student leader and Past President of the College Student Alliance. Her work with the Mobile Integrated Team began with her role as an Adult Protective Service Worker, collaboratively supporting an individual in the community. In May 2019, she joined the MIT team as their Coordinator.

Obie Egbuchulam joined the MIT in September 2018. Obie has worked as a supervisor at the Out of the Cold program, a seasonal homeless shelter, since its inception. Obie has an undergraduate degree in Communications, a Post Graduate Diploma in Business and started a Masters program in Public Policy and Administration at Adler University.

BP3: Survivors of Homicide Victims and Mental Health

8:00am – 9:00am | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

Family members and friends of victims of homicide violence face mental, physical, and spiritual health challenges as they learn to survive without their loved one. However, research has historically focused on perpetrators and victims of homicide violence and has neglected to examine the post-homicide experiences of surviving family members and friends. The scarcity of research further perpetuates disparities in mental health and leaves policy makers and practitioners with little data to develop culturally responsive and evidenced-based interventions.

Dr. Tanya Sharpe and her team at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, CMHA Ontario and other partners collaborated to engage with survivors of homicide victims and their service providers across the province. This presentation will advance participants’ understanding of the needs of this population, identify promising culturally relevant approaches to practice and determine where supports are needed to serve specific populations.

Presenters:

Dr. Tanya L. Sharpe, University of Toronto

Uppala Chandrasekera, CMHA Ontario

Bios:

Dr. Tanya Sharpe is an Associate Professor and the Factor-Inwentash Chair in Social Work in the Global Community, at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto. She has extensive training and interdisciplinary practice and research experience related to the development and implementation of community based violence prevention and intervention strategies.

Uppala Chandrasekera, M.S.W., RSW, is the Director of Public Policy at CMHA Ontario, where she provides leadership in six program areas. Through her research, published writings and work in the community, Uppala examines the impact of the lived experience of discrimination and racism on the health, mental health and wellbeing of marginalized populations.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

C Sessions - 10:30am - 12:00pm​

C1: System Navigation in a Complex World – SURPRISE it’s NOT Broken!

10:30am – 12:00pm | Harris Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

System Navigation/Service Resolution regularly assembles service providers and organizational management representing a range of sectors (e.g., mental health, addictions, housing, police, family services, and other community services) to strategize on ways to meet the needs of individuals who are having the most serious difficulties. System Navigation/Service Resolution is by design very individualistic in focus. It supports front-line workers in collaborative problem solving, facilitates interagency case conferencing, and, when necessary, triggers system level interventions, all at the level of individual cases. Using a mock case conference style, this presentation will be identify how this process works and the outcomes that it has provided for youth in the Peel region.

Presenters:

Kim Paumier

Bio:

Kim Paumier has been working in Mental Health and Addictions for over 23 years and has been the System Coordinator for complex youth in Peel since the inception of that role over 5 years ago.

C2: Alternative Resolution Court – How Do We Spell SUCCESS?

10:30am – 12:00pm | MacDonald Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

The Peel Alternative Resolution Court is a collaborative approach in a “therapeutic judicial” environment at the A Grenville and William Davis Court. ARC supports individuals who are living with mental illness, developmental and intellectual delay, dual diagnosis, concurrent disorders, acquired brain injury and age related illnesses who come into contact with the justice system. The aim of this court is to redirect individuals from the criminal justice system to community and social supports. This process promotes recovery and reduces recidivism by approaching people with respect and dignity thus empowering positive change. The presenters will outline the collaborative approach created in this court for vulnerable people and for those who may not fare well in the regular court stream. Not all who attend ARC will compete their matters without sanctions, although they may be better suited, supported and served in our smaller, more intimate environment.

Presenters:

The Honourable Justice Paul T. O’Marra , Ontario Court of Justice

The Honourable Justice of the Peace Karen Murphy

Lucy Rasmussen, Assistant Crown Attorney

Christine Lund, Defence Council/Duty Council 

Karen McCallum, Peel Regional Police Court Liaison Officer 

Shelly Schneider, Manager, Mental Health and Justice, CMHA Peel Dufferin

Bios:

The Hon. Justice Paul T. O’Marra has been a judge of the Ontario Court of Justice since December 2016, based at the Brampton courthouse.  He was born and raised in Mississauga and attended Lorne Park Secondary School.  In 1986 he graduated from McMaster University with Honours, and in 1990 he graduated from the University of Windsor Law School and articled for the Law firm of Blenkarn & Roche. In 1992, His Honour was called to the Bar and joined the law firm of O’Marra & O’Marra.   Justice O’Marra practiced Criminal Law with O’Marra & O’Marra until 2000 when the law firm was renamed O’Marra & Elliott.  As defence counsel, His Honour appeared in all level of courts, as well as the Disciplinary Committee of the Institute of Chartered Accountants, the Ontario Review Board, the Ontario Judicial Counsel, Chief Coroner’s Inquests and police tribunals. From 2005 until his appointment, Justice O’Marra was legal counsel to the Peel, Halton, Niagara, Guelph and York Regional Police Associations. He assisted police officers designated by the Special Investigations Unit (SIU), the Office of the Independent Police Review Director (OIRPD) and who were under investigation for offences contrary to the Police Services Act (PSA) and the Criminal Code of Canada. From 2004-2005 he was a guest lecturer to the Morality Bureau of Peel Regional Police Service. In 2013 Justice O’Marra was the recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for “making a significant contribution to the policing community within Canada”.  He was the Vice President and President of the Peel Criminal Lawyers’ Association (PCLA) and the Regional Peel representative of the Ontario Criminal Lawyers’ Association.  During his career he was a frequent guest speaker on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the judicial system.  He taught criminal law and procedure at Algonquin Careers Academy.  

Justice of the Peace Karen Marie Murphy has an extensive background in policing and mental health management. She was a member of Peel Regional Police from 1987 until her appointment to the bench in 2011. During that time she was a Special Constable assigned to the Police Bureau at Davis Court. Her duties involved work with the Mental Health Court at the A. Grenville and William Davis Courthouse in Brampton. She also served with the Regional Coroner and organized Inquests as the Court Constable. Her Worship Murphy is a lifetime member of the Canadian Mental Health Association Peel Branch and held the position of Chair prior to joining the bench. She was also served on the Board of the Canadian Mental Health Association – Ontario Division. Her Worship continues to be actively involved in the Mental Health Committee at the A. Grenville and William Davis Court in Brampton, now the Alternative Resolution Court. Justice of the Peace Murphy was the 2009 recipient of the Ontario Women in Law Enforcement Award for Community Service. In December 2010 she was featured in Reader’s Digest Magazine as a “Hero in Mental Health” for her work with the mentally ill throughout Ontario and across Canada. In 2011, she was nominated for the Ontario Premiers Award in Community Service.

Lucy Rasmussen was called to the bar of England and Wales in 2005. She practised Criminal law as prosecution and defence and Civil law with a speciality in personal injury.  In 2007, she met her husband whilst skiing in Banff and began the process of converting her licence so that she could practice law in Ontario. She was called to the Law society of upper Canada in 2012. She was hired by the Peel Crown Attorney’s office in 2014 and is currently the Lead Mental Health Crown. She has family history of addictions and mental health issues and is very pleased to be involved in the Peel HSJCC and the Alternative Resolution Court committees.

Christine Lund is a Criminal Defence lawyer in Dufferin – Peel. Her practice focuses on representing vulnerable adults and youth who come in conflict with the criminal justice system, and she believes in a collaborative approach to lawyering. Christine is a member of the Alternative Resolution Court Committee at the A Grenville and William Davis Court in Brampton courthouse and the Peel HSJCC.

Shelly Schneider is the Manager of the Mental Health and Justice and SystemWise teams with the Canadian Mental Health Association Peel Dufferin Branch.  Shelly began her career in 1994 with the John Howard Society in the Supervision Services Program. Shelly joined CMHA Peel in 2007. She heads a team of 13 who provide support in Court Support, Release from Custody, Pre and Post Charge Mental Health Diversion and System Navigation.  The team can be found at the A Grenville and William Davis and Dufferin County courthouses. They offer intensive, individual assistance and advocacy to individuals with mental health, dual diagnosis and concerns relating to concurrent disorders who are in conflict with the law.  Shelly is the Chair of the Peel HSJCC and a member of the Provincial HSJCC and Executive Committee.

Karen MacCallum is a Court Liaison officer at the A Grenville and William Davis Court, with a focus working and advising on practice and protocol in the Alternative Resolution Court.  She has been working as a Civilian officer with Peel Regional Police for 15 years, including 8 years working as a Prisoner Escort officer. Karen’s career in corrections spans 26 years, starting as a Correctional Officer with the Ministry of Safety and Corrections.  Karen worked as a correctional officer and as a recreational officer at both Maplehurst Correctional Complex and Metro West Detention Centre.  Her passion working with the vulnerable population is evident in her commitment to community initiatives such as the Adult Mental Health Pre Charge Program in Peel Region.  Karen is currently an active member of the Alternative Resolution Court Committee, as well as the Peel Regional HSJCC.   

C3: Mobilizing Communities, Preventing Harm: The North West Community Mobilization Network

10:30am – 12:00pm | York Room (Lobby Level)

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

This presentation will provide an overview of the Northwest Regional Centre of Responsibility (formerly known as the Northwest Regional HSJCC). It will explain how the Kenora Rainy River District HSJCC and Northwest Regional HSJCC integrated principles of the Hub/Situation Table model into its HSJCC structure.

Presenters will share local data and experiences from mobilized Situation Tables in Kenora and Thunder Bay. They will highlight key successes that resulted from this alignment, including increased membership engagement, better collaboration and improved coordination of services for people with complex needs in conflict with the law. Presenters will discuss how data from Situation Tables and other local planning tables has been used to support and identify emerging systemic issues for discussion using the Northwest Regional Centre of Responsibility Issues Management Framework.

Presenters:

Constable Robert Bernie

Sara Dias, CMHA Kenora 

Mariah Maddock, NWCOR

Bios:

Constable Robert Bernie is a Community Mobilization Officer with OPP Kenora Detachment. Bob is married to Tracey and has two children (Emily, 24 and Jack, 21). He is an advocate of proactive/upstream/evidence-based crime prevention strategies. 

Sara Dias, MSW is the Executive Director of CMHA Kenora, Co-Chair of the RISK Steering Committee, Northwest Regional Centre of Responsibility (COR), KRRD-HSJCC & Provincial HSJCC. She also serves as Chair of the Kenora Police Services Board. Sara was instrumental in establishing the Mental Health Court in Kenora.

Mariah Maddock, MPH is the North West Community Mobilization Network Coordinator. She supports the Northwest Regional Centre of Responsibility (formerly known as NWR-HSJCC). Mariah was instrumental in mobilizing the Thunder Bay Situation Table and contributed to a regional engagement strategy to mobilize Situation Tables in the District of Thunder Bay.

C4: Mobile Crisis Response Teams in Ontario: A Provincial Framework and Toolkit

10:30am – 12:00pm | Governor General Room (2nd Floor)

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

Over the past 20 years in Ontario, there has been ongoing development and implementation of collaborative crisis response teams that involve police and mental health and addiction service providers responding to front line crisis. While great successes have been seen, there remains significant variance in existing collaborative crisis models across the province which has created challenges in evidence-based evaluation and sustainable funding. In January 2019, a cross sector, multi-disciplinary team emerged to  research, analyze, collect data and identify promising practices from these varying models.

This presentation will provide an overview of the Collaborative Crisis Response Model Provincial Working Group and their work to date including a framework and toolkit that offers core components and common approaches for successful development and/or enhancements for a model in your community to support a more effective response from the 9-1-1 call through the continuum of service for persons experiencing mental health and/or addictions crisis.

Presenters:

Christine Conrad, CMHA Ontario

Lisa Longworth, Ontario Provincial Police, Community Safety Services

Brooke Young, MSW, RSW, Director of Services, Regional, CMHA Waterloo Wellington Branch

Bios:

Christine Conrad is a policy analyst at CMHA Ontario and supports the Provincial HSJCC. Previously, she was program advisor to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and to the former Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. Christine was called to the bar in 2016 after articling with Legal Aid Ontario. She is co-chair of the Provincial Working Group for Collaborative Crisis Response Models.

Lisa Longworth is a Program Analyst who began work with the OPP after 26 years in the social services sector mental health and addictions, and her last 10 years in clinical work. Her role with the Ontario Provincial Police Community Safety Services is as the Provincial Lead to support the ongoing community collaboration between police and their valued partners in mental health and addictions. She is co-chair of the Provincial Working Group for Collaborative Crisis Response Models.

Brooke Young is the Director of Service at CMHA Waterloo Wellington supporting Mental Health and Justice services, Integrated Police and Crisis Teams, Here 24/7 and Peer Support and Self Help services. Brooke has worked in a variety of areas including Child Protection, Sexual Assault Treatment, Children’s Mental Health, Crisis Intervention, LGBTQ Services and System Planning. As a social worker with a previous career in information technology, Brooke is always looking for new ways to improve services and leverage technology to support better quality care.

C5: Innovative Treatment Program Addressing the Needs of Under Served, Very Diverse Populations (Personality Disorders and IDD/ASD)

10:30am – 12:00pm | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

Individuals with dual diagnoses of mental health and intellectual disability and/or an autism spectrum disorder are denied access to Ontario Ministry of Health (MOH) and Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS) funded community rehabilitation supports. Individuals who have a reputation of difficult to manage behaviour and diagnoses on the personality disorder spectrum are also denied access to programs. Often these unsupported individuals are either on the brink of or have received criminal charges. The Justice Services and Dual Diagnosis programs at CMHA Nipissing offer a unique emotion regulation skills development program bringing together these diverse populations. This presentation will provide the audience with concrete tools and innovative ideas that have successfully been used at CMHA Nipissing to divert criminal charges.

Presenters:

Amy Betzner-Massana, RP

Stacy Talbot, RSW

Bios:

Amy Betzner-Massana is a Registered Psychotherapist employed as a clinician in the Dual Diagnosis Program at CMHA Nipissing. She has completed her degree in Disability Studies at Ryerson University and the Habilitative Mental Health certification program at Brock University.

Stacy Talbot is a Registered Social Services Worker who has been working in the mental health field for the past 30 years. She is employed as a Court Diversion Case Manager at CMHA Nipissing.

Stacy and Amy have been providing modified DBT sessions to diverse populations for several years.

C6: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder – From an Understanding to a Framework

10:30am – 12:00pm | Lismer Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an invisible brain-based disability that arises due to prenatal alcohol exposure. FASD one of the leading causes of developmental disabilities in North America. Understanding the structural changes in the FASD brain will allow for a better understanding of the cognitive/behavioural difficulties witnessed in the child’s environment, including interactions with the justice system. The rate of FASD among the inmate population is approximately 28 times higher than in the general population. Youth with FASD are 19 times more likely to be confined than their non-affected peers. Those in human services who have a good understanding of FASD and relevant strategies are better able to provide a supportive environment that will enable success. The learning objectives of this session include gaining an understanding of: the impact of FASD on brain domains, the characteristics of someone with FASD and a framework to use with individuals with FASD.

Presenters:

Meera Sidhu

Bios:

Meera Sidhu is the Peel FASD worker representing ErinoakKids, Centre for Treatment and Development. She has a masters degree in Neuroscience, coupled with many years of experience working with families who have been affected by prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD.

C7: Changing the Conversation

10:30am – 12:00pm | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Addictions

Description:

This presentation will look at addiction in light of what we have learned from the ACE studies. It will examine addiction as a problematic response and coping mechanism for trauma; how neuroscience predicts the behaviours that make addiction a stigmatizing disorder; changing the conversation into one that allows the disorder to be understood and bring compassion into the exchange; and helping people come to terms with addiction in a way that encourages them to seek a solution and lessens the shame and denial.

Presenters:

Karen James

Bio:

Karen James is a person with lived experience of addiction and mental illness. She was born into a family of addiction, became addicted herself, recovered from addiction and she has worked in the field of addiction for over 20 years.  She was a founding volunteer for Partners for Mental Health. She received The Royal’s Inspiration Award in 2011.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

D Sessions - 1:00pm - 2:00pm​

D1: Ottawa Mental Health Court Therapy Dog Project

1:00pm – 2:00pm | MacDonald Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

Since September 2018, the Ottawa Courthouse has brought in accredited therapy dogs to interact with accused persons, their families, witnesses, counsel, courthouse staff, social workers, officers: everyone and anyone who wants to get the well-documented stress reducing benefits of doggy affection. The project began as a twice monthly pilot during Mental Health Court Clinic days and has been so well received that it’s expanded to include twice a week visits to Mental Health Court, and monthly visits to Drug Treatment Court and Youth Mental Health Court.

The presentation will offer strategies in dealing with building management, finding a community partner, setting up a program, evaluating success, and focus on the benefits of inclusion, as our project dogs provide support to everyone at the courthouse.  Our program, which had no cost to set up, has not only brought happiness, it has support from all stakeholders in the Ottawa Courthouse.

Presenters:

Carol-Lynne Saad

Constable Maya Spitz

Bio:

Carol-Lynne Saad was called to the bar in 1989 and worked as defence counsel. The Ottawa Courthouse Therapy Dog Project is her retirement project and was conceived while she was sitting in court yet again waiting for court to begin, realizing that there were a lot of stressed out people around who could really use some time with a dog.

Constable Maya Spitz has been working at Ottawa Police for almost 25 years. During this time, she obtained a Master’s degree in Chemical and Environmental Toxicology. Constable Spitz has worked patrol and Front Desk Services and has been involved in Emergency Preparedness projects. For the past year, she has been assigned to the Mental Health Unit. The experience of having to find emergency pet care options for clients apprehended under the Mental Health Act has made Constable Spitz aware of the many worries and distractions patients experience during extended periods of treatment.

D2: The Implementation of an Integrated Psychological Therapy Approach

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

Individuals with psychosis can face deficits with their social interactions. Empowering our clients to lead meaningful lives and have valued social roles is an important part of the psychosocial rehabilitation work that we as practitioners do. However we need to also equip our clients with the skills required in order to have successful social interactions. The implementation of a year long group that utilizes an Integrated Psychological Therapy approach will be discussed including successes, challenges and partnerships. Participants will be guided through simulations of some of the module content to appreciate the nature of the group process and session objectives. A question and answer period will allow for further discussion of concerns related to resource allocation, sustainability and research.

Presenters:

Michael Ivany, Occupational Therapist

Bio:

Michael Ivany has worked as an occupational therapist in both Canada and New Zealand. He started working in forensic mental health in 2007 and has worked in both inpatient and community settings.

D3: A Safe Place to Land: Bridging the Gap Between Custody and Secure Housing

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Governor General Room (2nd Floor)

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

This presentation explores the efficacy and advantages of maintaining and sustaining housing for Indigenous individuals being released from custody. Together, the Canadian Mental Health Association – Sudbury/Manitoulin and the N’Swakamok Native Friendship Centre manage an 8 month transitional housing unit allocated to individuals living with mental health and addictions challenges, as they are released from custody. Due to the disproportionate number of Indigenous individuals in Sudbury’s correctional facility, the “Justice Unit” was initially established to offer an opportunity for individuals facing additional barriers. The unit has also supported non-indigenous individuals in times when the unit would otherwise be empty. The individuals residing in the “Justice Unit” have seen both successes and challenges. Ultimately, this presentation examines the agencies’ learnings throughout the unit’s 2.5 years in operation and concludes with ideas for continued support for previously institutionalized individuals requiring intensive housing.

Presenters:

Kerri Grace, CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin

Catherine Sloan, CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin

Bios:

Kerri Grace is the Justice Coordinator with CMHA-S/M. Kerri has a background in Law and Justice and a graduate certificate in Alternative Dispute Resolution. She began her journey at CMHA-S/M as the Release From Custody Worker and transitioned into the Coordinator of the Program where she is passionate in driving change in the mental health and justice field.

Catherine Sloan, Justice Case Manager, has been with CMHA since 2018 and began at CMHA-S/M as a placement student in the Social Service Worker Program. With a background in psychology, Catherine strives to assist individuals to work around barriers and to ensure that marginalized populations receive advocacy and have access to the same resources as others.

D4: Intersections: How Cross-Sector Partnerships Lead to Success for Youth, Families, and Police.

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Lismer Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

Intersections is an early intervention police referral program that connects youth who come into contact with police with appropriate supports to address issues that may contribute to their involvement with the justice system. The Intersections Coordinator plays a key role in connecting youth aged 6 through 17 with suspected mental health, developmental disabilities and/or substance use issues who are at risk of becoming justice involved. With the support of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), implementation of Intersections began in the rural community of Bancroft in the summer of 2018. This presentation will explore the unique cross-sectoral relationships needed for Intersection’s success and the importance of program adaptability to unique local contexts.

Presenters:

Sarah Phoenix, NHCS

Officer Philippe Regamey, OPP

Jeff Rocca, CAMH

Laurissa Watson, CAMH

Bios:

Sarah Phoenix is the Intersections Coordinator from the host agency NHCS.

Philippe Regamey is the Community Service/Mobilization officer and OPP detachment lead.

Laurissa Watson, Evaluator, and Jeff Rocca, Knowledge Broker, provide support as part of the Provincial Systems Support Program at CAMH.

D5: Stigma and Misconceptions in the Correctional Culture

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Harris Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

Our mission statement at the Elgin-Middlesex Detention Centre is that our clients have the right to dignity, respect,and the legality of presumption of innocence. It is a requirement of the mental health nurse to advocate for fair, safe, humane treatment that meets the clients human rights, ministry policy, and the College of Nurses standards of practice. The mental health nurse providers assist the clients when the ability to adjust to incarceration is moderately to severely impaired. Orem’s nursing model of “the patient is encouraged to be as independent as possible” is facilitated by the promotion of independent problem solving/decision making and autonomy. This is articulated through client focused programming and support. The mental health nurse’s goal is to provide crisis management, stabilization, maintenance, and facilitate forward movement in the clients mental health status.The correctional culture is misunderstood and stigmatized. This affects basic care needs and community supports for this population. As mental health nurses in the correctional community we advocate to ensure equal treatment for our highly vulnerable population.

Presenters:

Vanessa Hartland, RN

Bridget Zimmer, RN

Bios:

Vanessa Hartland RN worked in Oncology for 12 years, the Emergency Department for 5 years, and EMDC for 11 years. Vanessa is presently assigned to the female unit and works with high needs mental health individuals. Vanessa is a member of the local HSJCC, and she sits on the Parkwood Advisory Board, actively presenting to a family education group. Vanessa is a clinical resource for the Adult Therapeutic Courts.

Bridget Zimmer RN has been in nursing for 29 years at EMDC. Bridget was the first Mental Health Nurse to establish the current Mental Health Program at EMDC in 2015. Bridget is currently a member of the Flexible Assertive Community Treatment Team (FACTT); a clinical resource for the Adult Therapeutic Courts; a  member of the local HSJCC committee; a team member of community outreach; and a lead nurse for the major mental health units.

D6: Community Based Treatment Program for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities who Engage in Sexually Abusive or Concerning Behaviours

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

The Centre for Behaviour Health Sciences (CBHS), Program for the Assessment and Treatment for Healthy Sexuality (P.A.T.H.S.) has been supporting persons with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) who engage in sexually concerning or abusive behaviours throughout York and Simcoe Regions for over 30 years. This presentation will outline our unique comprehensive assessment and treatment process. We will discuss how we apply theoretical knowledge, such as the Risk Need Responsivity principles, to help support this population. The focus of this presentation will be to provide a framework on the structure and process of our community based treatment program. This presentation will also explore clinical partnerships with community agencies, which include justice and mental health services. Collaborative approaches to providing evidence based support and risk reduction planning will also be addressed. Furthermore, our response to addressing/overcoming barriers and challenges which arise in our service will be examined.

Presenters:

Christa Salmon, MSW, RSW

Bio:

Christa Salmon, MSW, RSW, has worked as the Central East Educator/ Behaviour Consultant with the Centre for Behaviour Health Sciences Program for the Assessment and Treatment for Healthy Sexuality (P.A.T.H.S.) since 2003. She currently holds the position of Clinical Programs Consultant and specializes in the area of assessment and treatment of sexually abusive behaviours and persons with intellectual disabilities. She provides clinical consultation, training and workshops for community partners. 

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

E Sessions - 2:15pm - 3:15pm​

E1: Forensic Mental Health and Justice Services in Ontario

2:15pm – 3:15pm | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

The 2019 Ontario Budget announced investments of $174 million in 2019-20 to support community mental health and addictions services, mental health and justice services, supportive housing, and acute mental health inpatient beds. This presentation will focus on new investments in Mental Health and Justice Services, as well as provide updates on Forensic Mental Health Services in the province.

Presenters:

Dianna Cochrane, Forensic Mental Health and Justice Unit, MOHLTC

Amy Herskowitz, Forensic Mental Health and Justice Unit, MOHLTC

Kaitlin Yousif Forensic Mental Health and Justice Unit, MOHLTC

Bio:

Dianna Cochrane is currently the Manager for the Forensic Mental Health and Justice Unit of the Ministry of Health. This unit is the lead for the forensic Mental Health provincial program, supporting system planning and development. Prior to this, Dianna spent over 15 years in hospitals within the forensic division, both as a clinician and an administrator.

Amy Herskowitz has over 18 years experience in the public service and is dedicated to the community mental health and justice service sectors. She’s managed a broad range of programs and issues within her portfolio, including Acquired Brain Injury, Assertive Community Treatment, and complex clients who require inter-ministerial collaboration to bridge service gaps.

Kaitlin Yousif is a dedicated mental health advocate with a strong passion for social justice. She has been with the public sector for over 5 years supporting different levels of government, and numerous programs and portfolios.

E5: Down the Rabbit Whole

2:15pm – 3:15pm | Tom Thomson Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

Youturn is committed to implementing identified best practices when working with youth and engaging them in evidenced based clinical models that promote cognitive and practical skill development through one-on-one counselling.  Furthermore we work with our youth, and families, through connections with community services and advocating for their rights and needs. This approach, although not always ‘in the lines’ of conventional wisdom, allows the youth we serve the best possible chance for reducing their risk of recidivism within the YCJS and a smoother transition into other services.

Youturn has a unique perspective of what travelling through the YCJS can look like for youth and the professionals who work with them. Through knowledge sharing activities and discussion, the presenters will demonstrate how these perspectives have increased engagement and lowered recidivism. Participants will leave with an understanding of the processes and challenges youth may face and how to best support them.

Presenters:

Matt Kennedy, Youturn Youth Support Services

Luke Smith, Youturn Youth Support Services

Bios:

Matthew Kennedy is a counsellor at Youturn Youth Support Services within the Community Support Team and Intensive Support and Supervision Program. He works with high risk youth referred through Youth Probation Services and the Children’s Aid Society.

Luke Smith is a graduate of the Algonquin College Child and Youth Care program and currently employed at Youturn Youth Support Services as a counsellor for their On Point Program working with at risk gang involved youth.

E3: The HSJCC Network Member Engagement Plan

2:15pm – 3:15pm | Lismer Room

Stream:

Models/Frameworks for Better Collaboration

Description:

The HSJCC Network Member Engagement Plan was developed by the HSJCC Secretariat as a part of the Provincial HSJCC’s ongoing work to support the efforts of the Local and Regional committees. The purpose of the Member Engagement Plan is to improve the participation and communication of HSJCC Network members, as well as the flow of information between different committees.

This presentation will provide an overview of the conception, development and implementation of the HSJCC Network Member Engagement Plan over the past two years. The presentation will feature results from the work that has happened so far and discuss what is to come in the future. It will also highlight the challenges and lessons learned from the engagement work that has happened since the Member Engagement Plan was released.

Presenters:

Tasha Rennie, HSJCC Secretariat

Candace Vena, HSJCC Secretariat

Bios:

Tasha Rennie is the Network Engagement and Communications Officer for the HSJCC Secretariat. She provides support in the areas of communication, member engagement and knowledge exchange. Tasha has worked with the HSJCC Secretariat, housed at CMHA Ontario, since the Member Engagement Plan was launched in 2017. Tasha has a background in digital communications and international development. 

Candace Vena works in the Public Policy Department at the Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario Division. As the Network Coordinator for the HSJCC Secretariat, Candace acts as the first point of contact for the Provincial HSJCC and is responsible for the administration and coordination of this provincial planning body. Candace also provides operational support to the Regional and Local committees. Prior to this role, Candace worked in a variety of community-based mental health and justice settings, including work with individuals charged with domestic violence offences, youth with complex mental health needs involved in the justice system and homeless populations.

E4: Bolstering Resiliency in Professionals and Clients

2:15pm – 3:15pm | Governor General Room (2nd Floor)

Stream:

Resiliency for the Professional

Description:

Many individuals are impacted by the aftermath of traumatic and victimizing experiences, resulting from accidents, illnesses, interpersonal violence and other traumas. About 75% of these individuals will evidence resilience (Meichenbaum, 2012). Resilience is the ability to bounce back after trauma by utilizing effective coping strategies to handle ongoing adversities. Resilience is not a characteristic trait that we either have or do not have, but instead determines core competencies within ourselves that can be nurtured, developed and learned. This presentation aims to provide practical tools to help increase personal growth after experiencing trauma for staff and clients. More specifically, this presentation will cover specific ways to bolster our own resilience in six domains: physical, interpersonal, emotional, cognitive, behavioural and spiritual. Finally, this presentation will consider ways to tailor these resilience behaviours to promote quality of life.

Presenters:

Sumeet Shergill, York-Simcoe Brain Injury Services 

Bios:

Sumeet Shergill graduated from University of Wales with a MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis in 2010. Sumeet earned a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Psychology and Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2009. She is a behaviour consultant at York-Simcoe Brain Injury Services and a professor at Seneca College. Sumeet became a registered psychotherapist in May 2015.

E5: Building Bridges/Empowering a People in a Remote Indigenous Community

2:15pm – 3:15pm | Harris Room

Stream:

Special Populations

Description:

Pikangikum First Nation is a remote Ojibway community in the Kenora District of Northwestern Ontario. Due to the high number of youth suicides, addictions, and mental health calls for service the OPP brought the Community Response Unit principles to this remote community. Building bridges with community partners and fostering relationships built on trust and respect for cultural beliefs and the safety of the community, the CRU is comprised of police (OPP/Pikangikum FN Police) and local Mental Health workers. Together this team rose above political and cultural barriers to provide compassionate service around the issues of addiction, mental health and suicide.

Presenters:

Sergeant Jennifer Neamtz,

Calib Reiger, Pikangikum Health Authority 

Bios:

Sgt. Jennifer Neamtz has been a member of the Ontario Provincial Police for 15 years.  She has been a part of two successful Mental Health Teams prior to her current role as Sergeant at the Provincial Communications Center in Orillia.   Jennifer has had the pleasure of assisting in the creation and execution of the Community Response Unit in Pikangikum, ON, a First Nation Community in the Kenora District.

Calib Reiger hails from the Niagara area. He is a mental health worker with the Pikangikum Health Authority.  He was active in the successful implementation and realization of the Community Response Unit in Pikangikum. 

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Breakfast Sessions - 8:00am - 9:00am

BP4: Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation in Recidivism

8:00am – 9:00am | Harris/MacDonald Room

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

Problem-solving courts were developed to treat the root cause of criminality. Mental health and drug courts are two of the most common types of problem-solving courts in Canada. The models adopted by MHCs and DTCs vary substantially across jurisdictions in Canada.

The Peterborough Community Support Court (CSC) is a specialized criminal court established in 2011 to address the mental health and addiction issues contributing to criminal behaviours and thus reduce the recidivism rate among the populations of offenders facing these problems. It is unique in that it is one of the only concurrent disorder model courts in Canada. An evaluation of the CSC was completed in 2018. Data for the study was provided by a Peterborough Crown attorney who developed and managed the Peterborough CSC. The Crown recorded information on treatment program characteristics, completion status, criminal history, and mental health and/or addiction history of each participant. Recidivism data was provided by the Peterborough Police.

Presenters:

Kate Bertrand, FourCAST Court Worker

Kelly Eberhard, Provincial Crown Attorney

Bio:

Kate Bertrand has been an Addictions Counsellor in the Court Support role at Four Counties Addiction Services Team (FourCAST) in Peterborough, ON, for the past two years. She is part of the Community Support Court, Peterborough’s mental health and drug court, multidisciplinary team.

Kelly Eberhard is currently an assistant Crown Attorney. She was called to the Bar in 1999 (British Columbia) and 2000 (Ontario). Her work experience includes private defence/civil work, public defence work with Legal Aid Ontario and presently with the Ministry of Attorney General.

BP5: Mental Health Training for Correctional Officers: An Innovative Educational Approach

8:00am – 9:00am | Carmichael/Jackson Room

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

In Ontario, overrepresentation of individuals with psychiatric diagnoses in correctional settings is well-established. Correctional officers play a central role in supporting individuals with mental illness. Nonetheless, the training that correctional officers (COs) receive in mental health is often considered to be inadequate. The presentation will provide an overview of the curriculum and evaluation results of a Correctional Officers Mental Health Training delivered by the Centre for Addition and Mental Health (CAMH) at the Toronto South Detention Centre (TSDC) and Vanier Centre for Women in response to training needs. The curriculum focused on general mental health awareness; specific focus on psychotic, personality, and substance use disorders; assessment of suicide and violence risk; communicating with inmates in distress; and maintaining one’s own mental health. The day included two live simulations, which provided COs the opportunity to identify signs of mental illness, assess risk and respond strategically to manage and de-escalate each situation.

Presenters:

Tanya Connors, CAMH

Dr. Shaheen Darani, CAMH

Dr. Kiran Patel, CAMH

Additional Authors: Faisal Islam, Anika Saiva, Dr. Sandy Simpson

Bio:

Tanya Connors, MSW, has over 20 years of experience working in mental health and addictions. Tanya is the manager of the Forensic Early Intervention Service (FEIS), a jail based mental health and triage program with CAMH. Tanya is an Adjunct Lecturer with the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Shaneen A. Darani is a Staff Forensic Psychiatrist in the Forensic Division at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; Consultant Psychiatrist at the Unified Mental Health Court at Old City Hall, Toronto; and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Kiran Patel is a Staff Psychiatrist within the Forensic Division at CAMH and Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto. He is the Clinical Head for the CAMH FEIS, a partnership with the MCSCS. He is the Medical Head – Criminal Justice Interface – a CAMH leadership and coordination position.