Posters

Poster Presentations

PP1: CSI – Care, Support & Innovation: PSWs in Mental Health & Justice

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

We would like to present how our team is slowly developing expertise in providing a variation of PSW care within the LOFT Mental Health & Justice program, and how it reduces recidivism, hospitalization and, within a multi-disciplinary team approach, increases independence.

Presenters:

Cylene Rainville, Fritzie Casuga

PP2: Meet Me Where I Am: Providing Care to ‘Hard to Reach’ Groups Meet Me Where I Am: Providing Care to ‘Hard to Reach’ Groups

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

The Scarborough Health Networks Justice and Mental Health Program (JAMH) offers innovative and diverse services to individuals living with the challenges of chronic and persistent mental illness and criminal justice involvement. JAMH’s unique service delivery model exceeds organizational goals and targets by meeting clients where they are, both physically and in a psychosocial sense.

Through the use of an interdisciplinary team, and the programs commitment to including the voices of its clients and their families in program development, JAMH is able to provide collaborative and quality care to this population. The success of the JAMH program lies not only in its ability to provide assessment, diagnosis and treatment, but also by the innovative and creative manner that it responds to clients in a constantly changing environment. The team also prides itself on having no wait list and utilizing stake holder and client input to develop programming.

Presenters:

Halimo Hashi, Jawad Bhatti, Sharon Williams

PP3: DDu TRHP’in

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

The presentation will focus on the community reintegration of dually diagnosed clients within the Forensic System. We will present the process and formulation of the partnership formed between Ontario Shores and Christian Horizons to address the housing challenges this population encounters. The presentation will review the development of the program beginning with a clinical overview, procurement, blending of two different systems (forensic and the developmentally delayed sector), program development, and finally, the successful discharge of two clients into the home. We will review framework, roles, progress, strengths and challenges, and finally, the focus placed on recovery and goal setting with the clients.

Presenters:

Heather Perketa, Natasha Lorincz, Lyndsay Grant, Stephen Gibbs, Erick Remnkema

PP4: Released From Custody at Court Program – Possible Anywhere!

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

The Release from Custody at Court Program took root from the Prescott- Russell and SDG and Akwesasne local HSJCC and began as a pilot project between the Ottawa Carleton Detention Centre (OCDC), CMHA-Champlain East and Renfrew County Mental Health Services. The red sealed envelopes in this program are used to facilitate the transfer of special needs offenders’ belongings from OCDC to their respective distant courts. The ultimate objective is to assist people 18 years or older with mental illness who are currently in custody to transition back into their community more successfully, and to avoid further police, court and prison involvement. The program is available at the Cornwall and l’Orignal court since then and was featured at the 2015 HSJCC conference and the 2018 CMHA National conference.A special Provincial working group was created so this program can be reproduced anywhere leaving access to essential documents to help others in creating the program.

Presenters:

Lucie Charbonneau

PP5: Mental Health Pre-Charge Diversion Programs

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

Pre-charge Diversion Program is designed to divert offenders who have committed a minor offence and who are living with a mental illness or concurrent disorder away from the judicial system. Poster presentation will describe goals of the program and how it was developed by the CMHA Champlain East and will be sharing the signed Protocols and form created with 4 different Police departments with the support of the Crown Attorneys Office.

Presenters:

Johanne Renaud

PP6: A Pilot Examination of Opportunities to Further Increase the Benefits Accrued from Police and Crisis Service Collaborations 

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

The Ontario Provincial Police, Leeds Detachment (OPP- Leeds Detachment) and the Brockville General Hospital (BGH) have worked collaboratively to ensure that community residents who experience crisis receive prompt intervention and treatment in accordance to best practices and advance a safe timely resolution of the crisis situation. This collaboration, as in other jurisdictions, has yielded quantifiable benefits, such as, reductions in encounters resulting in apprehension under the Mental Health Act and transfer to ED as well as reductions in the levels of force utilized when apprehensions occurred.

Presenters:

Shawna Marshall and Elaine Senis

Mobile Crisis Intervention Team (MCIT)

Joint Initiative Leeds OPP

PP7: Exploring the Continuum of Care…One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

CMHA PD have enhanced their court support/release from custody teams to provide vulnerable individuals with a multidisciplinary team approach to support, both in custody and out. Using various assessment tools, clients are provided with the opportunity of a “light touch” to “intensive” model of service depending on their area of need, including identified risk/protective factors. The teams are comprised of individuals with specializations in substance misuse, dual diagnoses, peer support, family support, various form of abuse and forensic psychiatry, who all approach their work through a trauma informed lens. Individuals can move within this continuum of service, depending of their specific needs. As risk and need increases or decreases, so does the level of support from the team. Reduction in recidivism and use of emergency services is the primary focus. Collaboration with community partners is also key to move our vulnerable population into a place of hope and recovery.

Presenters:

Shelly Schneider, Paola Palozzi, Michelle Murray, Ainsley Galipeau

PP8: Victim-Offender Reconciliation – An Introduction and Why it Works!

Stream:

Innovation and Creative Community Response

Description:

Victim/offender mediation programs provide a unique opportunity for offenders to meet their victims face-to-face in the presence of a trained mediator (at CJADurham, we use a co-mediation model). The parties have an opportunity to talk about the crime, to express their feelings and concerns, to get answers to their questions, and to negotiate a resolution. Mediators do not impose settlements. The process is meant to empower communication between both parties.

Presenters:

Audrey Isenor, Andrew Lewis, Helen Lightstone

PP9: From Implementation Sustainability: The Ontario Safewards Community of Practice

Stream:

Forensic

Description:

Safewards is an evidence-based open source model of care, designed to reduce episodes of conflict and containment in inpatient mental health settings. The model is grounded in values which drive a Secure Recovery approach in Forensic Mental Health practice. Implementation of Safewards in all inpatient Forensic settings across Ontario was supported through the Forensic Directors Group beginning in 2016. Each setting across the province has adopted implementation and sustainability initiatives suited to their unique needs. The Ontario Safewards Community of Practice operates to support this process with the endorsement of all participating sites and the MOHLTC. This presentation will focus on the strategies employed in different settings to support implementation and current strategies to maintain fidelity to the model and drive sustainability of the practice over time. There will be input from several of the participating sites in this presentation.

Presenters:

Kendra Moore, Matt Le Blanc and Uzo Nnawuchi

PP10: Using a Multi-Disciplinary Approach in Supporting Complex Persons Across the Developmental and Justice Sectors

Description:

As institutions have closed, the presence of persons with developmental disabilities and their support needs has increased in Ontario.  For example, it is projected that the number of adults with developmental disabilities between the ages of 45-84 will increase by 17%-21% in the next ten years (Ouellette-Kuntz, Martin, & McKenzie, 2016).  We know that many of these individuals are at risk of/will become involved with the justice system due to complex behaviours  and/or illegal activities. It has long been recognized that individuals with a developmental disability/dual diagnosis who break the law or are involved in the justice system should be dealt with differently from the general population. The Community Network of Specialized Care in the Toronto Region has been using a unique approach through a multi-disciplinary team to try to help provide some of these supports and improve outcomes for these vulnerable individuals. 

Presenters:

Scott Skinner, Dual Diagnosis and Justice Case Manager, Community Network of Specialized Care Region, Surrey Place.

Before coming to Toronto Scott worked at an open custody Mental Health and Justice Treatment Facility for youth.  Due to his work within Correction Services Scott has a strong understanding of the criminal justice systems and institutional settings within Ontario. Scott has been a part of Developmental Services in Toronto for over 13 years. He began his career in Toronto supporting youth with a dual diagnosis (developmental disability and mental health) before moving to supporting adults with a dual diagnosis for the past 11 years in various capacities. 

Aamir Khan, Behaviour Facilitator, Community Network of Specialized Care Toronto Region, Surrey Place.

Aamir has worked in the field of behaviour analysis for the past 8 years and in the developmental services sector for 15 years.  Aamir is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with a Master’s degree in disability studies and Applied Behaviour Analysis from Brock University.  Additionally, Aamir has been a contributing author for a chapter in an edited book on the topic of the history of developmental disabilities across the world.  Aamir currently holds the unique position of Behaviour Facilitator with the Community Networks of Specialized Care in the Toronto Region.  Within this role, Aamir works with several different community partners in the developmental services, health care, and criminal justice sectors to promote the science of ABA and train mediators to implement behaviour analytic assessment and intervention procedures with adults with developmental disabilities and dual diagnosis.